​Why Look For Honey In A Skin Lotion?

03-21-2019


Photo Credit: On Pexels. CC0 License

Why do people use a skin lotion? What are they trying to fix?


For some it’s just for the comfort level. They have dry skin or mild sunburn. The problem may be as simple as revitalizing the skin after washing the dishes. Others may have a more serious condition such as cracks in the skin of the feet or hands, acne, psoriasis or eczema.

The causes of the various skin problems can obviously be different in each case. Causes range from skin being dried out by sun, wind or water to poor diet or allergies. In more serious cases the best a skin lotion can do is help alleviate the symptoms. There are an endless number of skin creams and lotions available to you depending on what the problem is that you are trying to solve.

We all know the benefits of Aloe Vera and Vitamin E but how often do you hear of honey being used to rejuvenate or repair skin.

Honey by itself is an amazing gift of nature. It is wonderfully therapeutic when taken internally. A large portion of honey is made up of protein, with other nutrients, including carbohydrates, minerals, B complex vitamins (including bioflavonoids), and vitamins C, D and E. It has been used for centuries to promote internal and external healing. Used as a food it can give you energy.

Externally, it can be particularly useful. For starters it is a natural antiseptic. It also has anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. Another characteristic of honey is that it will attract and (retain) moisture. It also acts as an anti-oxidant.

Now odds are that most people are not going to walk around with rated on their face or hands. – But would be happy with a non-greasy lotion or skin cream.

For dry skin or sunburn a lotion with honey would act as a natural “moisturizer”. For mild blemishes such as acne or small sores the anti-bacterial characteristics would again promote healing. With something like cracked skin in the hands or feet – these areas can have very minor bacterial infections keeping them from healing – a honey lotion can help kill off infection and again promote healing.

As a little aside – it wouldn’t be harmful at all to put raw honey on an open wound – probably better that hydrogen peroxide. Honey has hydrogen peroxide in it along with the other goodies. It will not only kill germs but promote healing.

So, including honey in a skin lotion will help moisturize, inhibit bacterial growth, help fight viral infection and can be helpful as an anti-inflammatory. With its many nutrients the addition of honey will help clear up minor blemishes such as acne or cracked dry skin like some people get on the heels of their feet or their hands and fingers.

​Learn How to Shower to Keep your Skin Healthy

02-25-2019

Every day you wash, shave, shampoo, clip your nails, wash, and dry your hair. Personal grooming, for most people, is a series of well-entrenched habits. And in most cases it is overdone. Would you be willing to change your routine if doing so made your skin look more attractive and created a better-looking you?

Most adults who are over thirty commit one big mistake when it comes to washing: The do too much of it. The shower in the morning, another after the gym, maybe even one before bedtime. If you spend twelve minutes in the shower, that’s too long. Cut your time in the shower to five minutes for your skin’s sake.

Too much washing results not just in cleanliness but in removing too much oil from your skin, and itchy and irritated skin, particularly in the winter months.

If you are using a shower without a water filter and with the steam build up, you are subjecting yourself and your skin to excess chlorine.

Below are bathing tips that you can benefit from:

1. Avoid using a washcloth on delicate areas, especially the mucous membranes. Do use a soft sponge to massage your skin. Use a glycerin soap and sponge and move in one direction toward your heart.

2. Use medium-warm water in the shower, the cooler the better, but not too cold.

3. If you have normal to dry skin, use Dove Unscented or Basis for Sensitive Skin on your body and either a soap-free cleanser or nothing at all on mucous membranes. Do use many of the commercial bar soap, since they are harsh on the skin.

4. If you tend to have oily skin, then use good glycerin soap. I use this type of soap and it removes just enough oil without drying my skin.

5. Skip a shower as often as you can. This may not seem like appealing advice but the more time you have in between showers the better. Skip a shower for a whole day once or twice a week, especially in the winter. Allow your skin to produce and maintain its natural oils. Or if this does not appeal to you, make your shower extra short on some days.

6. Make sure you use shampoos that contain mostly natural ingredients. A lot of commercial products contain synthetic chemicals, petrochemicals, and various dyes and artificial coloring. All of these unnatural chemicals are extremely bad for your health. Learn which chemicals to avoid.

So that you can improve the health of your skin, takes some time to look over your shower habits, Decrease the time in your shower, do use a water filter to remove toxins from the water, massage your skin, and use only natural products for your skin and hair.

Ten Habits for Flawless Skin

02-11-2019


Photo Credit: On Pexels. License: CC0


1. Don’t overdo the use of cosmeceuticals. With more and more beauty potions containing alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs), salicylic acids, antioxidants, and retinoids, mixing a cleanser from one line with a scrub or daytime moisturizer from another, then a night cream from yet another, can lead to over-exfoliation and irritation. This can add up to a real problem, especially for women with olive and darker complexions, who are more prone to discoloration when their skin is irritated.

2. Exercise. Twenty to 30 minutes of any aerobic exercise will give you a glow. Exercise increases blood flow, which brings more nutrients to the skin. But beware — the buildup of oil and perspiration can result in sweatband acne, folliculitis, and prickly heat. The solution: Shower as soon as possible after working out.


3. Exfoliate. By mildly abrading your skin with exfoliating agents, you will remove the surface layer of dead cells. Afterward, fine lines will be less visible and your complexion will glow. A microdermabrasion cloth can do the trick. To find out more about microdermabrasion cloths check out www.youthfulskinsecrets.com


4. Check your body for spots. Any sudden or suspicious-looking bump, mole, or other growth is reason to see a dermatologist. But as skin-cancer rates rise, having a full body check by a professional is crucial — especially for those of us in the baby-oil-and-iodine, pre-sunscreen generation. “People in a high-risk group — having a personal or family history of skin cancer, a lot of moles, fair skin, and/or light eyes or hair — may need regular checkups starting in their teens, and probably no later than age 35, Even if you’re not in a high-risk group, the American Cancer Society recommends that between the ages of 20 and 40, people have a cancer-related checkup, including a skin exam, every three to four years. Once you hit your 40s, begin having a cancer-related checkup, including a skin exam, every year.


5. Eat Healthy Foods. Antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E) — which help reduce sun damage and fight certain cancers, including skin cancer — are essential to your health. A well-balanced diet filled with at least five servings a day of fruits and vegetables, plus a multivitamin that meets RDA standards.


6. Don’t wear makeup to bed. We all know it, but we sometimes do it anyway. “Layers of foundation, powder, and blusher left on overnight can clog pores and lead to acne or folliculitis,” Take it all off before bed with a mild non-soap cleanser.


7. Handle pimples carefully. Poking, prodding, and popping can prolong a pimple’s life and make the problem worse. Scarring and the spread of infection are two possible consequences. To speed up healing, cleanse your face, then apply a warm compress, such as a clean, damp washcloth. Next, dab on an over-the-counter cream or lotion containing a drying agent, such as salicylic acid, sulfur, or benzoyl peroxide.


8. Get plenty of sleep. Most of us don’t get the eight to nine hours we need to avoid sleep deprivation. The effects aren’t hard to detect — namely, under-eye circles. The solution: Budget in sleep time, including a short afternoon nap whenever you can manage it


9. Drink plenty of water. Yes, drinking water does keep you hydrated, which helps skin look and feel better,” Get in the standard 6 to 8 eight-ounce glasses throughout the day — more if you’re a heavy exerciser. Also, many of the new sugar substitutes are dehydrating, so drink more water if you’re into low-cal liquids.


10. Use Natural Cosmeceuticals. To wisely to play it really safe, stick with one line of natural products which are formulated to work together. If you use any prescription products ask your dermatologist to advise you on how to combine prescription treatments with over-the-counter natural cosmeceutical products. For a listing our natural cosmeceutical product line you can check out our online address at http://www.derma-c.com

Ten Habits for Flawless Skin

02-11-2019



Photo Credit: On Pexels. License: CC0


1. Don’t overdo the use of cosmeceuticals. With more and more beauty potions containing alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs), salicylic acids, antioxidants, and retinoids, mixing a cleanser from one line with a scrub or daytime moisturizer from another, then a night cream from yet another, can lead to over-exfoliation and irritation. This can add up to a real problem, especially for women with olive and darker complexions, who are more prone to discoloration when their skin is irritated.

2. Exercise. Twenty to 30 minutes of any aerobic exercise will give you a glow. Exercise increases blood flow, which brings more nutrients to the skin. But beware — the buildup of oil and perspiration can result in sweatband acne, folliculitis, and prickly heat. The solution: Shower as soon as possible after working out.


3. Exfoliate. By mildly abrading your skin with exfoliating agents, you will remove the surface layer of dead cells. Afterward, fine lines will be less visible and your complexion will glow. A microdermabrasion cloth can do the trick. To find out more about microdermabrasion cloths check out www.youthfulskinsecrets.com


4. Check your body for spots. Any sudden or suspicious-looking bump, mole, or other growth is reason to see a dermatologist. But as skin-cancer rates rise, having a full body check by a professional is crucial — especially for those of us in the baby-oil-and-iodine, pre-sunscreen generation. “People in a high-risk group — having a personal or family history of skin cancer, a lot of moles, fair skin, and/or light eyes or hair — may need regular checkups starting in their teens, and probably no later than age 35, Even if you’re not in a high-risk group, the American Cancer Society recommends that between the ages of 20 and 40, people have a cancer-related checkup, including a skin exam, every three to four years. Once you hit your 40s, begin having a cancer-related checkup, including a skin exam, every year.


5. Eat Healthy Foods. Antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E) — which help reduce sun damage and fight certain cancers, including skin cancer — are essential to your health. A well-balanced diet filled with at least five servings a day of fruits and vegetables, plus a multivitamin that meets RDA standards.


6. Don’t wear makeup to bed. We all know it, but we sometimes do it anyway. “Layers of foundation, powder, and blusher left on overnight can clog pores and lead to acne or folliculitis,” Take it all off before bed with a mild non-soap cleanser.


7. Handle pimples carefully. Poking, prodding, and popping can prolong a pimple’s life and make the problem worse. Scarring and the spread of infection are two possible consequences. To speed up healing, cleanse your face, then apply a warm compress, such as a clean, damp washcloth. Next, dab on an over-the-counter cream or lotion containing a drying agent, such as salicylic acid, sulfur, or benzoyl peroxide.


8. Get plenty of sleep. Most of us don’t get the eight to nine hours we need to avoid sleep deprivation. The effects aren’t hard to detect — namely, under-eye circles. The solution: Budget in sleep time, including a short afternoon nap whenever you can manage it


9. Drink plenty of water. Yes, drinking water does keep you hydrated, which helps skin look and feel better,” Get in the standard 6 to 8 eight-ounce glasses throughout the day — more if you’re a heavy exerciser. Also, many of the new sugar substitutes are dehydrating, so drink more water if you’re into low-cal liquids.


10. Use Natural Cosmeceuticals. To wisely to play it really safe, stick with one line of natural products which are formulated to work together. If you use any prescription products ask your dermatologist to advise you on how to combine prescription treatments with over-the-counter natural cosmeceutical products. For a listing our natural cosmeceutical product line you can check out our online address at http://www.derma-c.com

Is Your Skin Care As Pure As It Can Be?

01-14-2019

Photo by Avantgarde Concept on Unsplash. License: CC0



To achieve a more radiant skin and beautiful complexion, it is vital to use only the purest skin care products, particularly those made only with raw, living and natural ingredients. In this article, I explain why this is the best external skin care possible, which, together with a healthy diet, right lifestyle and a positive mental attitude, helps the skin to become softer, firmer and achieve an unmistakable glow.

From the outset I’d like to emphasize that becoming more beautiful is available to anyone now, regardless of their present health, condition or age, who is willing to create beauty through changes in the diet, external skin care and mental outlook.

What we put on our skin is just as important as the food we eat. The skin is the body’s largest organ and plays a crucial role, not only in the elimination of toxins and in regulating our internal temperature, but also in terms of absorption.

Therefore it is critical to use skin and personal care products that, first of all, are free from toxic chemical ingredients. Some of these ingredients include:

a) Propylene glycol: Found in practically every skin moisturiser, propylene glycol is used as the base ingredient in the manufacture of brake fluid and industrial anti-freeze. It greatly damages and ages the skin. It also causes rashes and dry skin.

b) Lauryl sulphates: These corrosive chemical ingredients used in industry to manufacture garage floor cleaner and engine de-greasing are also one of the main ingredients in practically every major brand of shampoo, bubble bath, face wash, shaving gel & toothpaste. Lauryl sulphates eat away at the mucous lining of the skin, are highly irritant to the eyes and cause urinary tract infections.

c) Parabens: synthetic chemicals which have been linked with breast cancer. They are used as preservatives in many shampoos and personal care products.

Secondly, it is important to use skin care products that are made only with raw, living and natural ingredients such as raw cacao (cocoa) butter and cold-pressed oils. This is because the skin greatly nourishes from the life force, antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and essential fatty acids present in the natural ingredients.

The benefits are numerous. The life energy in the ingredients is highly nourishing and healing. Antioxidants for example, help to reverse skin ageing and inflammation and help heal scar tissue. Minerals play a key role in beautifying the skin, hair & nails. Sulphur, for instance, is a central component of collagen & connective tissue, which provides elasticity & flexibility to the tissues. Vitamins such as A, C and E are moisturizing, soothing and healing to the skin. Essential fatty acids help to remove toxins from tissues.

To ensure that the life force and all these nutrients are retained, skin care products must be made at temperatures below 40C. If ingredients are heated above this level during the manufacturing process, most of the antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and the life force in the ingredients are destroyed. A good example of this is cold-pressed olive oil, which has long been considered a topical remedy for wrinkles and facial lines. Not surprisingly, olive oil is the best source of raw vitamin E. However, it is also is extremely sensitive to temperature and light and becomes completely corrupted when heated.

Heated oils and fats when used in skin care products –even in the so-called most natural ones- are actually one of the worst offenders to skin beauty. They contain highly toxic transfatty acids, which may be absorbed into the cell membranes, causing them to become porous and weak. Heating oils and fats also leads to the creation of free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules that have lost an electron. Collagen, a protein molecule that constitutes 80% of the dermis, is particularly susceptible to free radical damage, which includes wrinkles, lingering scars and stiff collagen

In contrast, cold-pressed fats and oils kept at low temperatures help to beautify the skin, strengthen the cell membranes and restore nutrients to the tissues.

In short, the best external skin care is to use products made using only 100% raw and living ingredients.